The Practice

renaissance womanIt feels like my life is a series of practice sessions. I practice painting. I practice playing the piano and singing. I practice meditation and yoga. I practice right relationship with nature. I practice inner, inter and extra-human communication. I practice bodywork. I practice gardening and nutritious food preparation. I practice movement and dance. I practice self-care. I practice self-love. Right now I am practicing writing…

What is all this practice about? Will I practice until I die or will I at some point master something? What is mastery? How does one recognize the moment the practice ends and mastery begins? Does it matter if I ever become a master of anything?

As I hear my questions the feeling that wells up inside is one of relief as I accept the idea of practice as a life-long way of being. I am a “Renaissance Woman.” I don’t just practice these things for a living. I do them for a life—a life that I love.

A woman I met recently when she attended a yoga class I was teaching stayed after class and we visited for a couple of hours sharing ourselves with one another. As we walked around my little retreat center looking at the tipis I had painted she said to me, “Chery, you are eclectic!”

I thought about that for a moment and said, ” Thank you. That is one of the nicest things anyone has ever said to me.”

I am a Renaissance Woman. I am coming to accept and appreciate that I’ve always been a seeker. Seeking is my thing, and it’s served me quite well.

One of my favorite Steve Jobs’ quotes is this: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.”

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One thought on “The Practice

  1. Really like this, Chery. I was talking with a fellow life coach the other day about what it means to be a coach. He said it’s a way of life – the willingness and the desire to keep doing my own work, my own exploration, my own inquiry about the meaning I want my life to have. To accept that I will never be a master in the sense of there being nothing left to learn. To continue learning the art and skill of coaching. If someone chooses to call me a master, or even if I successfully go through the Master Life Coach training, knowing that there will always be more to master, more to learn, more to explore. I think this is a good thing for me – I hate being bored!

    Like

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